Purpose of FreeMasonry

download (37).jfif

The Constitutions of the
FreeMasons 1723

Freemasonry is a fraternity. Its membership is restricted to men, but there is no hazing as is found in some college fraternities. The Masonic Order is a serious group.   It exists to take good men and help them to become better men. Thus, it is not a reform society. It does not exist to reform criminals, nor would such persons benefit from its teachings.

 

Masons undergo degrees as they continue to learn about the order. A “degree” is a drama in which a newcomer to Masonry, the candidate, is made to play a key part. These dramas have several characteristics and are progressive in nature, that is, they build on each other. These dramas are enacted with only Masons being present and are for the purpose of moral instruction. A unique characteristic of each Masonic degree is an “obligation” taken by the candidate. The obligation is an oath taken for the purpose of instructing the candidate in his Masonic duty. The three degrees have a biblical basis. Much biblical imagery is used in the ritual of the degrees. The central biblical image used in Masonic ritual is that of the building of King Solomon’s Temple, as meticulously described for us in the Old Testament books of I Kings and II Chronicles. Whenever a Masonic lodge is in session, the Holy Bible is open upon the lodge’s altar.

 

Masonry does require of its adherents a belief in God and in life after death, though it asks no one to expound upon the particulars of his understanding of those two beliefs. There is some memory work the candidate must learn after each degree is conferred upon him.   He has a set amount of time to learn the catechism, that is, a set of questions and answers, and to recite them before the lodge members at a lodge meeting.

 

Masonry is not a religion. There is nothing in Freemasonry to interfere with a man’s religious life. Persons of all faiths and Christian denominations are a part of the worldwide Masonic fraternity. Religion and politics are two subjects not allowed to be discussed when a lodge is in session.

 

Masonry teaches the importance of helping the less fortunate. It especially stresses care for the widows and orphans of Masons.   Indeed, most Grand Lodges have within their jurisdiction a home for aged Masons, their wives and widows, and also a home for Masonic orphans. In the U.S.A. alone, all branches of Masonry combined provide over of $1.5 million of charitable aid per DAY!

download (78)_edited.jpg

“We take good men and make them better”

Freemasonry is designed to improve a man and is often represented by making the rough ashlar stone into a smooth stone

Masonry asks its candidates not to tell the details of its ritual to non-Masons. This is not because Masonry is ashamed of anything. It is because an element of secrecy serves to heighten interest in Masonic teaching. It is also because most people would not benefit from being introduced to Masonic teachings out of the context of the Masonic degree system.

 

Why do Masons keep their rituals a secret? For the same reason that the ancient stonemasons kept their trade secrets. Their secrecy helped to maintain a better quality of work. Our secrecy today helps us to make a good man better. It is difficult to believe that the secrets of Masonry are evil when you consider the heritage of Masonry that includes a long list of influential leaders such as Paul Revere, George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Theodore Roosevelt, Douglas MacArthur, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston. It is difficult to believe that the secrets of Masonry are evil when you see so many Masons working as a vital part of every community to provide better churches, better schools and better governments. It is difficult to look into the eyes of a little child in a Shrine Hospital and say the secrets of Masonry are evil. If we really believe the biblical teaching, “by their fruits ye shall know them” then we must believe that the secrets of Masonry really do help to make a good man better. 

Masonry asks its candidates not to tell the details of its ritual to non-Masons. This is not because Masonry is ashamed of anything. It is because an element of secrecy serves to heighten interest in Masonic teaching. It is also because most people would not benefit from being introduced to Masonic teachings out of the context of the Masonic degree system.

Why do Masons keep their rituals a secret? For the same reason that the ancient stonemasons kept their trade secrets. Their secrecy helped to maintain a better quality of work. Our secrecy today helps us to make a good man better. It is difficult to believe that the secrets of Masonry are evil when you consider the heritage of Masonry that includes a long list of influential leaders such as Paul Revere, George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Theodore Roosevelt, Douglas MacArthur, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Stephen F. Austin, and Sam Houston. It is difficult to believe that the secrets of Masonry are evil when you see so many Masons working as a vital part of every community to provide better churches, better schools, and better governments. It is difficult to look into the eyes of a little child in a Shrine Hospital and say the secrets of Masonry are evil. If we really believe the biblical teaching, “by their fruits ye shall know them” then we must believe that the secrets of Masonry really do help to make a good man better.

 

The influence of Masonry is like the influence of the home and the influence of the church. It does not produce perfect human beings. Despite the best efforts of the home, there has never been a perfect child.   Despite the best efforts of the church, there has never been a perfect Christian. Despite the best efforts of Masonry, there has never been a perfect Mason. Nevertheless, there is a place for all these in our society.   Man’s basic nature is such that he needs every good influence he can get.  He needs the powerful influence of a good home.   He needs the powerful influence of a dedicated church made up of dedicated believers. He needs the influence of dedicated teachers in public schools.   But, when it is all said and done, it doesn’t hurt to have a little extra push that comes from civic organizations, professional organizations, and from fraternal organizations. Masonry has a proud heritage of 171; years of service to the State of Texas and we hope this discussion has helped you come to a better understanding of the purpose of our fraternal organization.   Texas Masonry now looks to the future with the hope that a better understanding will allow the lodge to take its rightful place in every Texas community, right alongside the church, the home, the schools, and the civic organizations as a positive force for good. With this better understanding, there is every reason to believe that we can all work together to make our government, our schools, and our churches even stronger than before. The strength of Texas has always been built upon the combined efforts of all these groups, and the Grand Lodge of Texas has contributed valuable service to our churches, our nation, our state and our community.

Masons You Know

download (38).jfif
FAMOUS FREEMASONS THROUGHOUT HISTORY

Throughout history, Masonry has attracted many great men, it's debatable whether it was Masonry that made them great or they brought greatness to Masonry. One thing for sure, the lessons taught in Masonry was appealing and attracted men who were great or/ and ended up becoming great

Masonry is what you bring to it, and if you seek to become a better man, the best version of yourself, and to reach your full potential, then you will find just that in the fraternity but only through your own work and actions

Here are but some exemplary men who sought Masonry

George Washington

“Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence..."

The first President of the United States, George Washington was initiated as a Freemason in 1752. He graduated to Master Mason in less than a year and performed Masonic rites when he laid the cornerstone of the Capitol in 1793. He received a Masonic funeral; even today, Masons take pilgrimages to his tomb at Mount Vernon.

George Washington.jpg

Benjamin Franklin

“They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.”

Prominent scientist, inventor, and civic activist, the United States founding father Benjamin Franklin is perhaps one of the most famous Freemasons. Alongside his duties as Grand Master of Pennsylvania, Benjamin Franklin formulated theories of positive and negative electrical charges and invented the lightning rod and bifocal glasses. Benjamin Franklin also printed the first Masonic publication in the colonies - a book called The Constitutions of the Free-Masons. It’s one of the rarest books in the world today.

Benjamin_Franklin_large.jpg
Winston_Churchill_large.jpg

Winston Churchill

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”

Initiated in 1901, this two-time British Prime Minister had family history with the Masons and was a member of Studholme Mason Lodge No. 1591 in England.

J._Edgar_Hoover_large.jpg

J. Edgar Hoover

“The best way to appreciate the nature and objectives of an enemy is to observe him in action.”

One of the Freemason’s most dedicated members was the founder of the FBI, J. Edgar Hoover. He was a Master Mason by 25 years old, became a 33rd-degree Inspector General Honorary in 1955, the highest level in Freemasonry.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

The former Governor of New York and 32nd President of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt became an Honorary Grand Master of the Order of DeMolay in a ceremony that took place at the White House.

download (7)_edited.jpg

Voltaire

“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”

The author of notable books such as Candide, Voltaire was encouraged to join the Freemasons by none other than Benjamin Franklin.

Voltaire.jpg
Wolfgang_Amadeus_Mozart_large_edited_edited.jpg

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

“Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together go to the making of genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius.”

The famous Austrian composer was the son of a Freemason and wrote several Masonic musical numbers. Composer Franz Joseph Haydn belonged to the same lodge as Mozart. Other notable Johann Christian Bach was also a Freemason.

Sir Alexander Fleming.jpg

Sir Alexander Fleming

The man who discovered penicillin, Sir Alexander Fleming, was a Freemason. He became the master of his lodge in 1924 and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1945.

Theodore Roosevelt

“Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.”

Roosevelt, the 26th president, was made a Freemason in New York in 1901. He was known for his virtue and refusal to use his status as a Mason for political gain.

Theodore Roosevelt.jpg

King Edward VII

“No, I shall not give in. I shall go on. I shall work to the end.”

An active Freemason throughout his life, when Edward, as the Prince of Wales, was installed as Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE) in 1874, he gave great impetus to the fraternity. The Prince was a great supporter of and publicist for Freemasonry. As Grand Master, he regularly appeared in public, both at home and on his tours abroad, laying the foundation stones of public buildings, bridges, dockyards and churches with all due Masonic ceremonial.  Under his patronage Freemasonry was constantly in the public eye and Freemasons became known in their local communities. Edward VII was a vigorous contributor to the world’s largest fraternity.

King Edward VII.jpg
Sam Houston.jpg

Sam Houston

“A leader is someone who helps improve the lives of other people or improve the system they live under.”

General Sam Houston, who presided at the formation of the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas in 1837, was President of the Republic of Texas, Governor of Texas, and Governor of Tennessee as well.  Sam Houston, who took his Masonic work in Tennessee, became a member of Forrest Lodge No. 19 in 1854.

Davy Crockett.jpg

Davy Crockett

“You may all go to hell and I will go to Texas.”

David “Davy” Crockett remains one of the best-known American folk heroes. ... After serving as a colonel in the Tennessee militia and in a stint in the state legislature, he was elected to the U.S. Congress in 1826. During his tenure in Washington, Crockett was initiated into Freemasonry and became a Master Mason.

Davy Crockett is also one of the defenders of the Alamo